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21.3.08

Responsibility No More Time To See How The Wind Blows

Time to take character inventory of the kind of people we have around us. Are they part of our family? A friend, an associate or perhaps a business partner?

Do they unnecessarily contribute to our stress or our anxieties? What are we doing about it? Take stock. Much of our sanity and well-being depend on it. Take irresponsibility out of the door.

Characterize a responsible person and these are things he or she is NOT:

1. Able to do anything without guidance or supervision.
2. Accountable and unanswerable for his or her own behavior.
3. Someone who can be trusted or depended upon to do things on his or her own volition.
4. Able to follow through on obligations.
5. Conscious of agreed upon or set rules.
6. Able to stand on own actions, impulsive but always blames others for his mistakes.
7. Trustworthy.
8. In possession of good self-esteem.

Anyone will get that picture good...

Learning how to tackle responsibility into one's life:

1. Take your life in your own hands, and what happens? A terrible thing: no one to blame.
~Erica Jong

2. Even when we know what is right, too often we fail to act. More often we grab greedily for the day, letting tomorrow bring what it will, putting off the unpleasant and unpopular.
~Bernard M. Baruch

3. The best years of your life are the ones in which you decide your problems are your own. You do not blame them on your mother, the ecology, or the president. You realize that you control your own destiny.
~Albert Ellis

4. You are not responsible for the programming you picked up in childhood. However, as an adult, you are one hundred percent responsible for fixing it.
~Ken Keyes, Jr.

5. We are made wise not by the recollection of our past, but by the responsibility for our future. ~George Bernard Shaw

6. Why do children want to grow up? Because they experience their lives as constrained by immaturity and perceive adulthood as a condition of greater freedom and opportunity. But what is there today, in America, that very poor and very rich adolescents want to do but cannot do?

Not much: they can "do" drugs, "have" sex, "make" babies, and "get" money (from their parents, crime, or the State). For such adolescents, adulthood becomes synonymous with responsibility rather than liberty. Is it any surprise that they remain adolescents?
~Thomas Szasz

Nuff Said!

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